Review of Nathan Alling Long’s The Origin of Doubt

Julia MacDonnell

The Origin of Doubt, Nathan Alling Long’s glorious debut collection of short fictions, is dedicated ‘to those who don’t quite fit in.’ Its fifty stories, some no more than a paragraph long, could serve as a missal for a vast congregation of outcasts and wanderers; angst-ridden adolescents, erotic explorers, and philosophical self-searchers. These stories – […]

An Interview with Philadelphia Writer Larry Loebell

Julia MacDonnell

Philadelphia writer Larry Loebell, who placed third in Philadelphia Stories’ 2015 Marguerite McGlinn Fiction Award for his story 49 Seconds in the Box, has just published a collection of novellas. Titled Seven Steps Ahead, it is his second collection of stories in as many years. In a recent interview, Loebell described these works of fiction […]

A Letter to the Philadelphia Stories Readers

Adriana Lecuona

I’m thrilled to announce that I’m joining the Philadelphia Stories team as the new Creative Nonfiction Editor. Susette Brooks, my predecessor, has moved to Baltimore for a job opportunity.

George Saunders: My Imaginary Boyfriend

Aimee LaBrie

George Saunders, author of Lincoln in the Bardo and several excellent short story collections, visited Rutgers the other day to do a reading. I went to his master class, which was an informal-ish discussion and Q&A for students and rabid Saunders fans like me.  He showed up, this ordinary man in jeans and a button […]

Emily Rose Cole, Love & a Loaded Gun (Minerva Rising Press, 2017)

Courtney Bambrick

Emily Rose Cole won the 2014 Sandy Crimmins National Prize in Poetry for the poem “Self-Portrait as Rapunzel,” selected by judge Jeffrey Ethan Lee. Her poem considers the relationship between Rapunzel and her mother and how a person accepts or rejects various aspects of abuse or isolation because of the attention or even affection that […]

Dawn Manning Packs a Subtle Punch in Postcards from the Dead Letter Office

Nicole Marie Mancuso

Philadelphia poet Dawn Manning brings a historic influence to her writing in Postcards from the Dead Letter Office, using a form of Japanese lyric poetry called the Tanka to create quick, hard-hitting poems that float on the tongue and leave lasting images on small pieces of page. In an engrossing debut, Manning weaves snippets of […]

Also They Are Families Too

Alicia Askenase

In the apartment there is smoke.  Margarita comes to sit and packs feet into shoes.  Time for the next shift.  It’s original sin if you believe it.   They have begun to round us up, vienen para nosotros, in Jersey, in LA nos esperan en Wal-Mars, escuelas and hospitals. We won’t be there to pick […]

I Consider a Twitter Follow

Cortney Lamar Charleston

I pendulum on whether to press the button. I pause. I ponder the little blue birdie that tells all of our thoughts to the world, wonder if bald eagles have already gone extinct―dropped dead to the earth like bombs built of bone, beak and feather.   To say I’m living in a time without symbols […]

Field of Rye at Twilight

Louise S. Bierig

How do you explain to your six-year-old daughter, who stays with you two weekends a month, that you killed a dog?  That while you were returning from market in the van—you driving, she sleeping—a dog ran into the road, and you hit it. The driver has just turned thirty and thought the number would protect […]

The Lucky Ones

Kara Daddario Bown

On my last day of radiation, I sat eagerly awaiting my release from six months of treatment. In anticipation, my eyes scanned the fluorescently lit, crowded waiting room of Abramson Cancer Center. As I waited for my name to be called for the last time, I thought about the young girl—about five years old—who I […]